Iconic Nashville hot chicken restaurant closed due to fire

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A famous Nashville hot chicken restaurant is closed “indefinitely” after a hit-and-run driver crashed into a strip mall, starting a fire that damaged several businesses.
News outlets report that the main location of Prince’s Hot Chicken Shack in Nashville is closed because of the Friday morning fire. No one was reportedly injured in the crash.

Semone Jeffries, whose mother has owned Prince’s for 38 years, said the popular restaurant that draws locals and tourists hopes to re-open as soon as possible. She says officials need to evaluate the structural integrity of the building. The restaurant also sustained smoke and water damage.
Jeffries says Prince’s fans can visit the restaurant’s second location in Nashville.




The Music City Bowl sets more records in the 19th edition of Nashville’s New Year’s Eve tradition.

MCB Box Score Link

Photo Galleries Link

 

 

NASHVILLE, Tenn.  – Auburn won the coin toss, elected to receive and never looked back in a 63-14 win over Purdue at the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl on Friday.

The Tigers outgunned the Boilermakers 586-263 in total offense and . punted only once the entire game. They scored their first eight possessions of the game. “I’m real proud of our team,” Auburn head coach Gus Malzahn said after the game.

“They practiced extremely hard when we were at Auburn. When we got the bowl site, it was a business approach. That carried over. We talked about playing our best game of the year and we did that today.” The Tigers finished with their first postseason victory since the 2015 Birmingham Bowl against Memphis and accrued a set of records that is impressive by any college game standard.

Auburn finished its inconsistent season sending its seniors out the right way.This is the third year in a row that records have been set or broken at the Franklin American Music City Bowl.

Crazy stats takeaways the are not typos

#1: Auburn (8-5) needed only 63 seconds to set the tone for the MCB, with Stidham finding JaTarvious Whitlow for a 66-yard TD pass. Whitlow also added a pair of short TD runs as Auburn led 28-7 at the end of the first quarter.

Jarrett Stidham is presented Most Valuable Player trophy at the 2018 Franklin America Music City Bowl, December 28, 2018. Rights Reserved-Hillsboro Globe; Photo by Ashja Murchison.

Jarrett Stidham threw for a career-high 373 yards and five touchdowns in his final college game , and Auburn pounded Purdue 63-14 on Friday.

Stidham was voted by attending media as the MVP of the 2018 Music City Bowl.

#2: JaTarvious Whitlow scored touchdowns on his first three touches of the game. He has the 66 yard pass TD, a 2 yard TD and a 1 yard TD finishing with 10 rushing yards, seven carries and three TDs.

#3: Auburn scored the most points by an SEC team in a bowl, topping Alabama’s 61-6 win over Syracuse in the Orange Bowl on Jan. 1, 1953. The Tigers had a chance to match the most points ever in a bowl at 70, most recently by Army in the Armed Forces Bowl last week, but took a knee at the Purdue 1 after a replay review overturned a very late TD run by Joey Gatewood.

#4: Auburn scored TDs on its first eight possessions tying the the Music City Bowl record for most points and TDs set by West Virginia in 2000 — with 5:36 left in the first half.

#5: By halftime, Auburn led 56-7 with the most points scored in any half in program history after holding the ball for only 11 minutes.

Javarius Davis with his record setting touchdown in the first half of the Music City Bowl played at Nissan Stadium. Auburn beat Purdue 63-14. Photo by Terrianna Carter; Rights Reserved – Hillsboro Globe

#6: It was the most points by one team in a half in any bowl.

#7: Darius Slayton set a bowl record with TD catches of 74 , 52 and 34 yards and finished with 160 yards receiving.

Javaris Davis had a sack and an interception in the first quarter for Auburn, and Big Kat Bryant returned an interception 20 yards for a 45-7 lead with 12:29 left in the first half.

#8: Up 42–7 in the second quarter, the Tigers were determined to keep scoring on the Boilermakers. Auburn went for it on fourth-and-three at Purdue’s 38-yard line to gain the first down with Stidham’s 16-yard pass to Sal Cannella.

After moving the ball down the field, Auburn went for it on fourth-and-one, as Whitlow gained the first down with a four-yard run. The Tigers would go on to score on Anthony Schwartz’s six-yard touchdown run on third-and-goal.

#9: The possession time had huge gaps. Purdue had the ball for 19 minutes compared to only 11 minutes for Auburn in the first half, who scored too quickly to keep the ball. By the game’s end, Auburn held onto the ball for 33:41 minutes, while Purdue’s possessions tallied to 25:49 minutes.

#10: Stidham ditched the trend of players who will be entering the draft opting not to play in bowl game. Stidham said he had to play as a competitor. He was 13 of 18 for 335 yards and four TDs at halftime and nearly had a TD run only to be ruled just short. “In my two short years here, I’ve grown so close to these guys I could never imagine not finishing the season with them,” Stidham said.

Bonus: Only five other teams have scored more in a bowl game, and the Tigers set a school record for total yards in a bowl.

Of Note…..Purdue: Brohm has a lot to replace with a senior class of 29 counting walk-ons. The departing Boilermakers include quarterback David Blough and top running backs in D.J. Knox and Markell Jones. …….Auburn: The search for Stidham’s replacement began with sophomore Malik Willis who played a scarce 1:33.




Funeral set for Lebanon High grad adds to 2018 Wilson County teen shooting deaths

Services are scheduled Friday for a 2018 Lebanon High School graduate and member of College Hills Church of Christ who died after he was shot on Sunday, according to police.

Cameron Sean Luke Griffith, 19, is the most recent teenager killed in Wilson County from suspected gunfire in recent months. Griffith was driven to a Discount Tobacco store on North Cumberland Street, confronted by multiple people and then shot, according to statements made to police.

Mt. Juliet High School student JayShawn Taylor, 16, died after he was shot on Nov. 15, around the 200 block NW Clearview Drive in Wilson County, according to police. A 15-year-old was arrested in the case.

Jacob Ethan Doughten, 19, and a 15-year-old boy were both killed from gunfire on April 15, at a Pilot gas station on Murfreesboro Road in Lebanon, which investigators believe occurred during a robbery attempt as multiple people met for a drug transaction.

Griffith wanted to enlist in the Navy this spring, according to his older brother Brantly Cox, 30. Music, video games and the Dallas Cowboys were all interests for Griffith, his brother said.

“He had the biggest heart of anyone I’ve ever known,” Cox said. “He’d always help me with stuff, whether it was something small like putting a bed together for one of my kids … He was easygoing, laid back. He’d help anyone, he had the best heart.”

Lebanon police have not released further information on Griffith’s death or announced any suspects.

A $1,000 reward is offered to anyone with information that leads to the conviction of anyone involved in the shooting, according to the department’s Facebook page.

Visitation for Griffith will be 2-7 p.m., Friday at the Ligon & Bobo Funeral Home, 241 W. Main Street, Lebanon. The funeral service is scheduled immediately after at 7 p.m., also at the Ligon & Bobo Funeral Home.

A private interment will be at Cedar Grove Cemetery.

Three suspects are charged in the case.

 




Vanderbilt hires NBA G League President Malcolm Turner as its new AD

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Vanderbilt has hired NBA G League President Malcolm Turner as its new athletic director, opting for a business executive over candidates with experience in college athletic administration for the Southeastern Conference’s only private university.

Chancellor Nicholas Zeppos said current and former athletic directors were among the diverse candidates Vanderbilt considered before choosing Turner.

“Malcolm didn’t come up through college athletics but I think he is a great fit for Vanderbilt,” Zeppos told The Associated Press.

David Williams II, vice chancellor for athletics and university affairs and athletics director at Vanderbilt University is seen here shaking hands with former SEC Florida quarterback, Tim Tebow. (Photo Mike Strasinger)

Turner will start Feb. 1 and replace David Williams, the first African-American athletic director in the SEC, to cap a search that started in September.

It has been a remarkable run and I have cherished the opportunity to work with so many passionate and committed students, coaches and staff,” said Williams. “After 27 years as a senior administrator in higher education, I am also excited to move back to my first love of teaching and to bring all that I’ve learned and experienced fully into that role.”  ”

— David Williams, from his official resignation statement

Zeppos introduced Turner on a conference call with reporters Tuesday and said Turner was a top candidate from the first names suggested by the search firm used by Vanderbilt. Zeppos sees Turner’s experience will give him a sense of where college athletics are going.

“Vanderbilt is a really special place and offering that rare combination of student-athletes and that commitment to an opportunity for excellence on and off the field was just a very compelling proposition for me,” Turner said.

“The strategic thinking and the ability to kind of say this is where this should be going, it was very, very important to me,” Zeppos said.

A graduate of North Carolina, Turner earned both law and M.B.A. degrees from Harvard. He was a senior vice president at OnSport, a North Carolina-based sports and entertainment consulting firm that worked with the NBA, NFL, MLB, NASCAR and also media rights in both professional and college sports. After being acquired by Wasserman Media Group, Turner worked for the consulting division as managing director helping launch the company’s golf division.

He became the third president of the G League in 2014, and he worked on both coach and player development and pushed for two-way contracts with the league adding 10 clubs. He will be replaced as G League president by 12-year veteran Shareef Abdur-Rahim, currently the NBA’s vice president of basketball operations.

Turner also has been on advisory boards for Teach for America, North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, the UNC Board of Visitors and the board of the Morehead-Cain Scholarship Fund.

Map of the franchises for the 2018-2019 season.

John Ingram, chairman of the Vanderbilt Board of Trust and a member of the search committee, called Turner a unique candidate and a perfect fit.

“I’m excited to assist and support Malcolm as we write this next chapter in Commodores history,” Ingram said in a statement.

Vanderbilt faces a unique challenge in the SEC landscape fighting for attention and support in Nashville, which has become a professional market with the addition of the NHL’s Predators and the NFL’s Tennessee Titans in the late 1990s. This also is the SEC’s smallest and only private university with a small local alumni base along with high academic standards.

In the NCAA’s last Academic Progress Rate for the 2016-17 academic year, 11 Vanderbilt programs finished with perfect 1,000 APR scores with the football team No. 2 nationally. Yet under Williams, Vanderbilt won four national championships in baseball (2014), women’s tennis (2015) and women’s bowling (2007 and 2018). Football just earned its second bowl berth in three seasons.

“The business background certainly will be important for him in looking at the whole range of revenues, expenses, facilities working with a very talented management team and putting this all into a big and bold university strategic plan,” Zeppos said.

Williams also will be available for questions staying on campus as a full-time law professor overseeing a Sports, Law & Society program at Vanderbilt Law School. Turner called Williams a “legend” and someone whose expertise he plans on tapping.

“He certainly leaves a wonderful legacy, and I’m intent to build upon the fine work he and his team have already done,” Turner said. “I really believe the foundation is showing the future is bright, and I couldn’t be more optimistic about what we can accomplish together as a Commodore community.”

Turner said he discussed the future of Vanderbilt’s athletic facilities in general while interviewing for this job. Vanderbilt Stadium, home of the football program, had its last major renovation in 1981. Turner said he plans to start by listening to athletes, coaches and the Vanderbilt community first.

“Certainly we will develop an athletic strategic plan to help us build and grow the program,” Turner said.

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Follow Teresa M. Walker at www.twitter.com/teresamwalker




2018 Election Central

National and State Results

Highlights from State Election Results from 2018 as of 1:03 am local time

U.S. Senate Class I

1,917 of 1,969 precincts – 97 percent

Marsha Blackburn, GOP 1,198,410 – 54 percent

Phil Bredesen, Dem 972,563 – 44 percent


Governor

1,832 of 1,969 precincts – 93 percent

Bill Lee, GOP 1,268,772 – 59 percent

Karl Dean, Dem 838,237 – 39 percent


U.S. House District 1 Eastern Corner of State

186 of 206 precincts – 90 percent

Phil Roe, GOP (i) 159,224 – 77 percent

Marty Olsen, Dem 44,307 – 21 percent

Michael Salyer, Ind 3,869 – 2 percent


U.S. House District 2 East, Knoxville/Knox Co

177 of 177 precincts – 100 percent

Tim Burchett, GOP 171,994 – 66 percent

Renee Hoyos, Dem 86,635 – 33 percent


U.S. House District 3 SE and NE, Chattanooga

276 of 276 precincts – 100 percent

Chuck Fleischmann, GOP (i) 156,385 – 64 percent

Danielle Mitchell, Dem 84,632 – 34 percent

Rick Tyler, Ind 4,514 – 2 percent


U.S. House District 4 South Central

217 of 240 precincts – 90 percent

Scott DesJarlais, GOP (i) 139,064 – 63 percent

Mariah Phillips, Dem 75,801 – 34 percent

Michael Shupe, Ind 6,882 – 3 percent


U.S. House District 5 Central, Nashville

185 of 185 precincts – 100 percent

Jim Cooper, Dem (i) 177,661 – 68 percent

Jody Ball, GOP 84,196 – 32 percent


U.S. House District 6 North Central

254 of 263 precincts – 97 percent

John Rose, GOP 168,828 – 70 percent

Dawn Barlow, Dem 67,605 – 28 percent

David Ross, Ind 3,361 – 1 percent

Lloyd Dunn, Ind 2,100 – 1 percent


U.S. House District 7 West Central

281 of 281 precincts – 100 percent

Mark Green, GOP 169,769 – 67 percent

Justin Kanew, Dem 81,574 – 32 percent

Lenny Ladner, Ind 1,583 – 1 percent


U.S. House District 8 NW Corner of State

247 of 247 precincts – 100 percent

David Kustoff, GOP (i) 166,400 – 68 percent

Erika Pearson, Dem 74,126 – 30 percent

James Hart, Ind 5,509 – 2 percent


U.S. House District 9 SW Corner, Memphis

129 of 129 precincts – 100 percent

Steve Cohen, Dem (i) 143,690 – 80 percent

Charlotte Bergmann, GOP 34,710 – 19 percent

Leo AwGoWhat, Ind 1,414 – 1 percent




Early voting nears 350,000 ballots in Tennessee election

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennesseans are voting in record numbers with close to 350,000 ballots cast in the first three days of early voting.

According to vote totals on the Secretary of State’s website 346,130 early and absentee ballots had been cast in the midterm elections by the end of the day Friday. The number was continuing to update on Saturday.

Traffic jam ensues as Bellevue Library, a spot for Early Voting for Midterms, finds drivers circling parking lot looking for a spot, October 19, 2018.

The election includes a high-profile race between U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn and Democratic former Gov. Phil Bredesen to replace retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

In the governor’s race, polls show businessman Bill Lee with a lead over Democratic former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean in the race to succeed term-limited GOP Gov. Bill Haslam.

Voting was less robust than the first days of the 2016 presidential election, but not by a lot. Wednesday was the first day of early voting, and it saw 120,970 ballots cast, only about 20,000 behind the first day of the 2016 election. Voting did not drop significantly on Thursday, with 110,263 ballots, and Friday, with 114,897 ballots. The Friday numbers were continuing to update on Saturday as counties reported their totals to the state.

Election Day is Nov. 6. Voters can cast their ballots early through Nov. 1. Only those already registered to vote can participate.

Early voting locations are available at county election commission offices, as well as satellite voting locations, and are open Monday through Saturdays. To find your local early voting site, check your county’s website or download the GoVote TN mobile app.

Tennesseans must bring a valid driver’s license or photo ID issued by the state of Tennessee, a U.S. passport, a military photo ID or a Tennessee handgun carry permit. Out-of-state photo ID, college student IDs or local municipal IDs are not accepted.




Arvidsson scores 2 as Predators hold off Islanders 4-3

Click here for game highlights

NEW YORK (AP) — Viktor Arvidsson and the Nashville Predators are happy to be headed home after sweeping a season-opening trip to New York.

Arvidsson scored twice and the reigning Presidents’ Trophy-winning Predators held on for a 4-3
victory Saturday night, spoiling the Islanders’ home opener.

“We got what we came here for and a great start for the season,” Arvidsson said. “Excited for the home opener (against Calgary on Tuesday night), come home to Nashville and play for our fans.”

Mattias Ekholm and Craig Smith also scored, and P.K. Subban had two assists for the Predators, who beat the Rangers 3-2 at Madison Square Garden in the season-opener Thursday night.

“We did a great job coming off that first win. t’s never easy on a home opener and we had to face two of them so it’s good to get out here with the four points and go home.””

— Nashville Head Coach, Peter Laviolette

“We did a great job coming off that first win,” Nashville coach Peter Laviolette said. “It’s never easy on a home opener and we had to face two of them so it’s good to get out here with the four points and go home.”

Juuse Saros, starting in place of reigning Vezina Trophy winner Pekka Rinne, finished with 26 saves for the Predators.

Mathew Barzal had a goal and an assisst, and Valtteri Filppula and Anders Lee also scored for the Islanders, who were trying to win new coach Barry Trotz’s home debut. Josh Bailey had two assists and Thomas Greiss stopped 19 shots.

“We play like that, most nights we’ll be fine,” Lee said. “They just played a better game”

Trotz led Washington to the Stanley Cup championship in June before leaving in a contract dispute. He was then hired as coach of the Islanders to replace the fired Doug Weight after New York missed the playoffs for the eighth time in 11 seasons. The Islanders opened the season with a victory in Trotz’s debut, 2-1 in overtime at Carolina on Thursday night.

“We handled their speed well, our overall execution was good and we defended well,” Trotz said. “Overall, a good effort. We just didn’t get the result.”

New York outshot Nashville 22-11 over the final two periods and had several chances at the tying goal in the third, but couldn’t beat Saros.

“We have great goaltending on this team and they’re doing a great job back there,” Arvidsson said. “We’re trying to help them as much as we can. Sometimes they do amazing saves. It’s good to have them.”

Trailing 2-1 after one period, the Islanders tied it early in the second. Tanner Fritz deflected a shot by Filppula that bounced off both posts, and Filppula tapped it in from in front of the goal line on the right side at 2:46.

However, Smith put the Predators up 3-2 as he got a pass from Kyle Turris and fired it from between the circles off the post and in with 6 1/2 minutes left.

Nashville Predators left wing Viktor Arvidsson (33) scores a goal past New York Islanders goaltender Thomas Greiss (1) during the first period of an NHL hockey game, Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Arvidsson got his second of the night with 3:18 to go in the middle period from the right side to make it 4-2.

Lee, named the Islanders’ 15th captain in franchise history earlier in the week to replace the departed John Tavares, pulled New York within one with 29 seconds remaining in the second. Bailey’s pass deflected off Lee’s skate and then Saros’ pad before Lee knocked it in.

Arvidsson got the Predators on the scoreboard first as he passed the puck to himself between his skates while he got around defenseman Ryan Pulock, skated in and beat Greiss for his first 3:42 into the game.

“I thought I had (Roman Josi) on a 2-on-1 like last game but he was cutting behind me,” Arvidsson said. “So I figured I’d try to catch him (Pulock) standing still … and managed to do that and nice to see it go in.”

New York then tied it on a goal awarded after a video review with just under 8 minutes left in the opening period. Josh Bailey stripped the puck from Subban behind the net, sent it out in front to Barzal at the right side and the reigning Calder Trophy winner as the league’s top rookie put it between Saros’ legs. The goalie appeared to smother the puck with his pads, but the review showed his pad was across the goal line.

Ekholm regained the lead for Nashville as he beat Greiss from the top of the left circle with 3:04 left.

NOTES: Turris has 11 assists and 15 points in 20 games against the Islanders. … The Islanders and Predators conclude the two-game season series Oct. 13 at Nashville. … Islanders C Brock Nelson played in his 400th game. … Filppula, in his first season in New York and 14th in the NHL, has 10 goals and 27 points in 50 games against te Predators. … Trotz was Nashville head coach for the franchise’s first 15 seasons and holds the franchise records for games coached (1,196) and wins (557) — putting him third all-time in NHL history in both categories with one franchise.

UP NEXT

Predators: Host Calgary in their home opener on Tuesday night.

Islanders: Host San Jose on Monday.

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Follow Vin A. Cherwoo at www.twitter.com/VinCherwooAP

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More AP NHL: https://apnews.com/tag/NHL and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports




NASHVILLE NAMED BEST MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL TOWN IN AMERICA IN 2018


September 27, 2018
City and Sounds’ Franchise Garner Top Spot for Second Straight Year NASHVILLE – The City of Nashville and the Nashville Sounds have been named home of the best minor league baseball town in America, according to SmartAsset. “This is a tremendous honor for the City of Nashville and our fans,” said Sounds General Manager Adam Nuse. “We strive to represent the organization positively inside and outside of First Tennessee Park, and we believe this confirms that commitment.”

Based in New York City, SmartAsset is a business that helps people make smart financial decisions. SmartAsset looks at nine metrics when formulating scores for each minor league city and team.

The Sounds turn four double plays to help James Naile blank the Iowa Cubs Tuesday, April 10th at First Tennessee Park for the 2018 Nashville Sounds MiLB home opener. (Photo by Nashville Sounds Photographer, Mike Strasinger)

The following metrics are broken down into two sections to create a score.
Game Day Experience Factors
• Average attendance
• Average attendance as a percent of max capacity
• Win percentage
• Minor league class
Quality of Life Factors
• Violent crime rate
• Property crime rate
• Income after housing
• Unemployment rate
• Dining and entertainment establishments

Slide Heathcote batted two runs in and scored twice in the Sounds win 7-0 win against the Iowa Cubs, Tuesday night. (Photo by Nashville Sounds Photographer, Mike Strasinger)

Using a 0-100 scale, SmartAsset calculated Nashville’s “Game Day Experience Score” as 89.08 and “Quality of Life Score” at 71.76 to bring Nashville’s overall score to 80.42. Nashville was the only city with a minor league team to have a score of above 80.

In an online article released Wednesday, SmartAsset said “Nashville took the top spot once again. Residents of Nashville love attending Sounds’ games. According to our data, the Nashville Sounds is one of the teams whose games are most well-attended. Our research shows that the average Nashville Sounds game attracts nearly 8,700 people, filling roughly 87% of seats. This team also boasts a fairly good record and plays in Triple-A, meaning the quality of play on offer to fans is just one step below the major leagues.”

The 2018 ranking is SmartAsset’s fifth annual of America’s best minor league baseball towns. Nashville has finished first in each of the last two seasons after debuting on the list in third place in 2016.

The 42nd season of Nashville Sounds baseball begins on Thursday, April 4 2019, when the Nashville Sounds host the Iowa Cubs at First Tennessee Park.

Season ticket memberships are available now by calling (615) 690-4487 or by visiting www.nashvillesounds.com.




Lead and copper levels in school drinking water leads Detroit schools to shut off all fountains

DETROIT (AP) — The lead contamination of water that is available to school children in Detroit has caused districts around the nation to conduct their own water testing for lead and copper. School districts that are older than 75 years old are particularly likely to have pipes and/faucets that have lost any protective coatings and can inadvertently leach lead into drinking fountains in schools.

Tuesday, as Detroit schools opened to thousands of public schools students, the students were told to drink from district-supplied water coolers or bottled water on the first day of classes, after the drinking fountains were shut off because of contaminants in some water fixtures.

Superintendent Nikolai Vitti said last week that elevated levels of lead or copper were found in fixtures at 34 schools. Test results are pending for other schools.

Metro Nashville Public Schools have had entered Phase IV of the district’s water testing plan. The most recent report from April 2018 can be viewed here.

MNPS WATER TESTING RESULTS

The discovery of contaminated water in Detroit’s schools follows a lead-tainted water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

In 2014 and 2015, Flint didn’t properly treat corrosive water that was pulled from the Flint River. As a result, lead in old pipes contaminated the water going into homes and businesses, and it streamed from household taps as a brown and smelly fluid.

Some children in the city were subsequently found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood, which can lead to developmental delays and other health problems.

With results in for 138 buildings, 119 buildings had no lead levels above the public drinking water standard. Of the more than 4,000 samples taken during the past three weeks, only 38 showed lead levels above the standard of public water systems (15 parts per billion) – that is just less than one percent of the total tested. All 38 of those sample locations, which are in 19 schools, have been disconnected and taken out of service until repairs can be made and water retested.”

— MNPS, August 2017

Eager to not undergo the same health and financial fallout as Flint, officials decided no students at Detroit’s 106 public schools should be subjected to drinking mains water until a solution can be found and the water declared safe. School officials believe old fixtures, not the water source, may be to blame.

What levels of lead is safe in drinking water? The Center of Disease Control and Protection states “No safe blood lead level in children has been identified. Even low levels of lead in blood have been shown to affect IQ, ability to pay attention, and academic achievement. And effects of lead exposure cannot be corrected.”  This recommendation changed in 2012.

Phase IV is the last and ongoing phase of water testing in Metro Nashville Public Schools.

 

Vitti said the cost of the coolers and bottled water will be $200,000 over two months. He’s looking at developing a long-term plan for new central water stations at every school with independent piping systems, Vitti said.

But as parent Quala (KWAY’-luh) Bennett dropped two children off at Gardner Elementary Tuesday, she wondered why the district only recently began testing its water.

Metro Nashville Public School’s website explains that it has begun a voluntary water testing program. “In 2016, Metro Nashville Public Schools (MNPS) embarked on an ambitious, first-ever, voluntary water testing program in the wake of the lead crisis in Flint, MI and other areas of the country. We wanted to make sure water in our schools is safe for students and staff.”

What began as a two-year, two-phase water quality testing program at MNPS, has now expanded into a dynamic and comprehensive water quality testing and remediation program encompassing installation of new water fixtures, replacement of water lines,  quarterly random water quality testing, monthly maintenance testing and flushing water lines after long breaks.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention-September 4, 2108

In March 2018, MNPS Superintendent, Dr. Shawn Joseph released a statement. ““Our goal as a school district is to ensure that our schools’ drinking water is safe. As a parent of two Metro Schools children and as the Director of Schools, the idea that a supervisor would discuss a workaround on our water fountains knowing that this is a huge concern for many families is upsetting and unacceptable. We place the health and safety of our students above all else. We are investigating and will follow up with our maintenance staff to ensure no water outlets have been modified. I have already reached out to the principal of West End MS, School Board Leadership, the PTO President, and the concerned parent who raised this concern to answer any questions and provide information. We will continue to proactively and voluntarily test for lead and monitor our drinking water in schools.”

However, the way in which lead levels are tested in MNPS is controversial. On August 7, 2018, Mayor David Briley announced that Davidson County will no longer use a “pre-stagnation flush” water samples protocol. Flushing the night before is not considered a reliable method to collect accurate levels of lead.

A top expert from the Flint, Michigan, water crisis told  that the method being discontinued provides test results “that are junk. You know, you’ve got to applaud people for doing the testing, but frankly those results need to be thrown right in the garbage,” said Professor Marc Edwards of Virginia Tech.

Marc Edwards is one of the leading scientists consulted by the Nashville Mayor’s office. “What we did was make sure everybody understood what the best science is on this front, to make sure that we were testing in a way that was going to get an appropriate reading of what a child might be exposed to if they walked into the school and drank from the fountain,” Briley explained.

The new plan supported by Briley calls for random sampling of 10 percent of all drinking and food prep outlets every year. The target level considered safe will still be a lead level of 5 parts per billion or lower. That’s the same standard that the Food and Drug Administration has set for bottled water.

“We feel like it’s going to be very protective, more protective than what the state is going to require,” the mayor added.

 




SLANT announces its fall lineup and partnership with performance organization, OZ

SLANT’s Fall Lineup

SLANT (Student Literary Artists of Nashville, TN) is partnering with OZ Arts Performing space to offer a one-of-a-kind creative opportunity for teen writers.

The best part of these opportunities is – IT’S FREE!

Applications for these opportunities are due soon, however.

All applications are due September 5th.”

Registration is currently open, so teens can reserve their seats right now.

SLANT is the youth programming arm of The Porch Writers’ Collective —a nonprofit center for writing based in Nashville, TN.

Our mission is to foster Nashville’s literary community by providing area teens with opportunities to learn and practice creative writing in its many forms.

Any teen can become a member of SLANT for free. Being a member allows you to stay  updated on the latest creative writing news. You’ll be the first to hear about all of SLANT’s workshops and events as well as other creative writing opportunities in Nashville and beyond.

Soon the leaves will be turning. The yellow of trees in early autumn always reminds me of sharpened pencils. Creative energy is in the air. Enjoy the start of the school year, and, as always, thanks for helping us reach Nashville’s young writers. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

A YEAR AT OZ, creates a special partnership between SLANT and OZ Arts Nashville

SLANT is seeking creative, motivated teen applicants for “A Year at Oz,” a unique, year-long artistic opportunity that combines the worlds of literary and visual art. If you like writing and art, check this out. It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity, and it’s free!

Oz Arts Nashville is a non-profit arts organization that uses a renovated former cigar warehouse to host large-scale artistic performances. Past shows have included musicians, puppeteers, visual artists, dance companies and more. Most OZ performance blend several types of art to create a unique mixture of sights, sounds, and motion.

If selected for the project, you will attend, free of charge, Oz Arts Nashville’s entire 2018-2019 performance season, including works by Phantom Limb Company, New Dialect, Kronos Quartet, and others.

Along with the other teens selected, limited to five writers, you’ll create new pieces of creative writing in response to each performance. Your group will work closely with SLANT director Joe Kane, who will provide writing exercises and background info to help put each performance into context and get your creative wheels turning. We’ll also meet for several group discussions to offer each other suggestions and inspiration.

Work created for this project may take many forms: poetry, narrative, hybrid forms, critical essay, participatory journalism, spoken word, and more. We are interested in discovering what the experience of each performance inspires you to write.

If selected, you must commit to attending the full 2018-2019 Oz Arts season and producing at least one written work for each performance. Here is a list of performances we will be attending. Some performances will be playing for two or three nights, and you can choose which night you’d like to attend; some performances are one night only.

Oct. 12 – 13: Falling Out

Nov. 15: Ghosted

Dec. 14 – 15: Ink

Dec. 19: The Longest Night

Feb. 22 – 24: The Triangle & Girls

March 22 – 23: A Thousand Thoughts

May 8: Papalagui

June 13: The HEARD Live!

“A Year at Oz” is completely free for participants and limited to five writers. Anyone age 13–18 may apply. Deadline for applications: Wednesday, September 5.

TO APPLY, PLEASE SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING TO [email protected] BY SEPTEMBER 5:

1) A statement of interest, max 500 words, that discusses: your background in writing and why writing in response to performing arts appeals to you.

2) A sample of your creative writing. This could be a story, a poem (or several poems), a piece of nonfiction, a piece of journalism, or something else. If you have a piece of writing that expresses your artistic style but doesn’t fit one of those categories, that’s okay. Send it. We have open minds.

Direct any questions to [email protected]

 

Fall Workshops for Teens

 

Where You From? A Poetry Workshop

Saturday, Sep. 15, 1:30 – 3:30

How does where we are from show up in our writing? In this workshop, we will write out our experiences, capturing the landscape, people, and memories, of the past and current spaces we live in.

 

Writing Scary Stories

Saturday, Oct. 20, 1:30 – 3:30

Hook hands, moonlight, and rumblings from the deep. Who doesn’t love a scary story? Just in time for Halloween, learn some tips for creeping out your readers.

 

Using Poems to Tell Stories

Saturday, Nov. 17, 1:30 – 3:30

In this workshop we’ll brainstorm our past stories, real and imagined. Then, with the help of some creative prompts, we’ll use those memories to create beginnings and first drafts of original narrative poems.




20 people protesting poverty were arrested in march from Legislative Plaza to the Justice A.A. Birch Building

NASHVILLE – The recent protest supporting the elimination of poverty in Tennessee which was held  in from of the Justice A. A. Birch had many Nashville citizens wondering, “Why did they have to arrest people for a peaceful protest for something that need help?”

Every protest has a method to getting the attention of those observers passing by. Some protests concentrate on pithy signs, others have a sit-in or even a die-in. At the Tennessee Poor Peoples protest, protesters chained themselves  to each other, marched from a rally at Legislative Plaza toward the Justice A.A. Birch Building.

Unfortunately, 20 people was arrested were arrested at the Tennessee Poor People’s Protest before they could arrive at the judicial building

Nashville Metropolitan Police officers on bicycles and foot surrounded the groups in the middle of the street.

After the warnings the police began making arrests. The protesters were arrested on a charge of obstructing a roadway. One was arrested for resisting arrest.

The Poor People’s Campaign, is a movement that has branded itself as “a national call for moral revival” that builds on the work of the civil rights-era initiative by the same name.

The protesters wore papers pinned to their shirt with the labels of groups disproportionately affected by incarceration. The focus of this protest, associated with similar demonstrations being held in other cities around the nation, was on the connections between systemic racism, voter suppression, poverty and discrimination against immigrants.

The Poor People’s Campaign announced, “This was a good movement for Nashville,” said by a older lady looking on to the protest. At least 600 others have been arrested in other peaceful protests. “I think its’ sad that people can’t voice their opinions without getting arrested if it was peaceful no harm was done,” said by Amanda Osborne about how she felt. The Tennessee Poor People Protest has move a lot of people. A barber is the architect of the Moral Movement that started with protest at the North Carolina State Capitol.




President Trump speaks with James Shaw, hero from the Waffle House Shooting

WASHINGTON  —Monday, May 14th President Donald Trump finally acknowledged the Waffle House shooting in Antioch, TN by calling and speaking with James Shaw, the graceful and courageous hero who helped to stop the suspected shooter, 29-year-old Travis Reinking from killing and injuring more people.

President Trump  complimented and commended Shaw who wrestled an assault-style rifle away from Reinking as he was shooting patrons at the Waffle House. Shaw, also suffered third degree burns on his hands because he grabbed the rifle while it was hot from firing.

White House spokesman Raj Shah says Trump conveyed in a press briefing that the two had spoken but had not other details regarding the conversation.

James Shaw and his friend were dining at a Waffle House in Nashville on April 22, 2018 when the gunman wearing only a jacket, no pants or other clothing, opened fire outside with an AR-15 rifle killing two and injuring two more before storming the restaurant.

A total of four people were killed. Shaw and three others were injured.

Shaw has been hailed as a hero for wrestling the rifle away and throwing it over a counter. Image result for waffle house shooting

Travis Reinking, after a 38 hour manhunt, and the lock down of many schools and businesses, was apprehended on Monday following the 3:30 am Sunday morning shooting. The police found him in the woods behind a construction site and it was in Antioch, South East of downtown Nashville.

Reinking faces charges of criminal homicide and attempted criminal homicide and is being held without bond in the Nashville jail.  Travis Reinking was set at $2 Million-$500,000 for each homicide count, however, within 24 hours his bond setting had been changed to no bond.

Much has been discussed on social media as to why President Trump has taken so long to acknowledge the second mass shooting with in a year in Nashville.